Christie's to offer the collection of the late Oliver Hoare

22 October 2019
artdaily.com


LONDON.- On October 25th, Christie’s will present the collection of the late Oliver Hoare (1945-2018). A highly influential and much loved art dealer who specialised in Islamic art, Oliver inaugurated Islamic sales at Christie’s in 1975 when working for the auction house. Known for celebrating the remarkable stories of objects from across countless countries and eras, and the joy and intrigue that they could bring, Oliver assembled a collection of works of art for his exhibitions under the banner ‘Every Object Tells a Story’ where a number of these pieces were shown. Comprising approximately 130 lots, the sale will include works of art from all over the globe, ancient and modern, with individual estimates from £300 to over £1.5 million.

Led by works from the Islamic world, the top lot is an exceptional 15th century Timurid manuscript – known as the Jam-I Jam – by Mawlana Shir Ali, with four illustrations by the celebrated and extremely rare artist [Kemal al-Din] Bihzad, which was once part of the Mughal Imperial Library; it is the earliest known work by the artist, produced with the calligrapher with whom he worked again on a manuscript now in the Bodleian Library, Oxford (estimate: £1-1.5 million). Equally characteristic of the collector’s eye is an arresting 17th century silver apple with bite marks; it opens to reveal a pomander in the shape of a skull, which is reputed to have been in the possession of King James II (estimate: £12,000-18,000). It was sold at Christie’s in 1855 as part of the Bernal Collection.

William Robinson, Christie’s International Head of Group, World Art: “As head of the Islamic Department, I for many years enjoyed filling the position which was first created for Oliver. It therefore gives me huge pleasure that Christie’s have been asked to handle the Oliver Hoare sale, his family actively wanting to encourage new collectors, and with them, new stories to be told. Oliver was such an enthusiast for each individual work, the story it can tell, that it came alive when he discussed it.

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